Tag Archives: The Makers Shed

Handmade for the holidays

“People should never be shy of signing up for a workshop and having a go.”

LEARNING A NEW creative skill can be a big step for busy people, so there’s no better time than the holidays to make a plan to attend a workshop; and Glen Innes at the heart of the NSW New England region is the destination for handmade.

STONE SETTING Precision work on a pendant.

Resident silversmith at The Makers Shed, Richard Moon has been teaching metalworking and jewellery-making techniques for four years, and runs regular full or half-day courses for beginners and those with a few skills at the Glen Innes venue.

“I thoroughly enjoy helping people realise their visions in jewellery form,” he says. “It’s always a reminder of how I started out. Attending a two-day ring-making workshop in 2007 really set me on my course to becoming a full-time silversmith”.

“It really is possible to design and make a piece of jewellery in just one day,” he says. “We have all the equipment here at The Makers Shed, and if you want to bring a friend or two along, we have six silversmithing benches ready for your workshop. I’m here to ensure everyone goes home with a unique handmade experience under their belt, and a special piece to wear or give as a gift. You’ll sleep well that night, because even though the process doesn’t take up much space, it’s extremely challenging on the mind!”

CUTTING EDGE Printmaker Nadia Kliendanze finds inspiration in the everyday.

Also giving an upcoming workshop at The Makers Shed is Inverell’s award-winning printmaker Nadia Kliendanze, whose exhibition ‘Printed Matter Only’ is showing throughout the summer.

“I love to teach printmaking and linoprinting in particular, which is my favourite print medium,” Nadia says. “Beginners usually catch on fairly quickly. Those that already have an artistic practice of some sort create their own original linoprints, however, I have a selection of images that complete beginners can use. After all, it’s about learning the process, not learning to draw”.

“I undertook a Diploma of Fine Arts at my local TAFE and discovered printmaking,” she says. “I was initially attracted to the media because of its graphic nature and also the fact that it was an easy way to share my artworks with lots of people at a reasonable cost”.

PRINTED MATTER ONLY St Stephen’s Green, linoprint by Nadia Kliendanze.

“Later on when I undertook a visual arts degree and a masters in printmaking at Monash University I continued to work more intensely in that medium.”

Nadia’s exhibition encompasses botanical motifs, iconic destinations in Australia and Europe and often references well-known prints from the past, such as Hokusai’s ‘Great Wave’, but she also turns her attentions to the everyday.

“Sometimes I create a print out of something I have seen on my morning walk,” she says.

HANDMADE HEAVEN Ceramicist Anita Stewart is a member of Glen Innes Pottery Club.

Glen Innes-based ceramicist and potter Anita Stewart regularly has work on show at The Makers Shed, and is gearing up to share her skills over the summer at the Glen Innes Pottery Club, situated like the Shed on Grey Street, the town’s main drag.

“Discovering clay for me was like a fish taking to water,” she says. “I studied Fine Arts in Western Australia for three years. Like many artists, I had been practicing before I actually decided to do formal training. At Fremantle Tech I did units in painting design and drawing, then in 1995 I travelled to the New England region and discovered the wonderful ceramics courses run by Max Powell at the Glen Innes TAFE”.

“The inspiration to create a new body of work usually comes when working on new forms at the wheel. For instance, the last federal election inspired my ‘message in a bottle’ series. Using the surface of the pot as a canvas I add multiple layers to create an image that speaks. The New England Landscape has also given me great inspiration for my work.”

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE Ceramic vases by Anita Stewart.

According to Anita, the Glen Innes Pottery Club was established about 30 years ago, and has remained a vibrant part of the community. “Lots of well-known potters have been a part of the club,” she says.

Winner of multiple awards for her ceramics, Anita laughs when asked to define what it takes to be a practicing artist, adding that “stamina, determination and absolute passion” are essentials for anyone wanting to make a long-term career of creativity; although she believes people should never be shy of signing up for a workshop and having a go.

“It’s really nice teaching people how to work with clay because it’s a very tactile medium and they usually seem really pleased when they’ve created a functional and colourful work of art,” she says. “The wheel can be a bit more of a challenge, but they are overjoyed when they manage to throw a pot on the wheel.”

A complete range of handmade work by artisans from across the New England region is always available at The Makers Shed, and a regular schedule of creative workshops.

www.themakersshed.org

Music as medicine for the soul

A chance meeting between two old friends led to the formation of Armidale-based band Pantor. Glen Innes audiences get another chance to experience the vibe of this diverse group at The High Country Handmade Showcase at The Makers Shed on Sunday June 2.

“We love playing eclectic covers of happy tunes with a Latin-Spanish twist,” guitarist and singer Jon Anderson said of the group.

“Peter Georkas (guitar, bouzouki, voice) and Massiel Barros-Torning (guitar, voice) have been playing together for some time.

Massiel Barros-Torning. Photo: Peter Torning

“I knew Massiel and her music from the distant past but a chance meeting brought us together, and from the first jam session we knew we had something that was enjoyable and unique.”

According to Anderson, Pantor (which includes John Kellett on percussion and vocals) loves to play to an engaged audience and selects its performances carefully.

“We don’t play mainstream shows, we ensure that each show we do is an enjoyable experience for both ourselves and the audience,” he said.

“We are flexible enough to play as a two-piece duo or the full band with extra members.

“As we are all well-respected local musicians, it is not uncommon for other musicians to join us on stage for a song. We also mentor and include young music students at our rehearsals and can sometimes offer a guest spot in selected performances.”

The group has performed at The Makers Shed at Glen Innes before, at the first two High Country Handmade Showcase events that take place in the sunny, grassy yard of the venue on the first Sunday of each season.

“Visitors to the event had such an incredible response to Pantor,” Michael Burge of The Makers Shed said.

“The High Country Handmade Showcase is a marketplace for artisans and independent creators to get in front of discerning shoppers and audiences, and the musicians we showcase are an integral part of these events.

“Pantor’s music is uplifting and incredibly diverse. If you haven’t had the chance to experience them yet, come along to our free event on Sunday, June 2. Pantor will be performing from 11am in the yard,” Burge said.

“There’s gourmet brunch on offer, so grab your spot and enjoy the performance.”

Tailor-made music

The four members of Pantor are regularly joined by special guest performers, sometimes at the last moment.

“Angelo Saavedra often joins us to add Zamporias (pan pipes) and Charango (stringed banjo-like instrument) to the Latin Spanish theme,” Anderson said.

“Because we tailor each set list to suit the dynamics of each show, and communicate with and involve listeners, we generally have an engaged and entertained audience.

“Our theme is music as medicine for the soul.”

According to Anderson, Pantor is very much a group-led project.

“We generally get together weekly and almost always add a new song to our list,” he said.

“All of the members contribute to the ideas of our performance.

“If it feels good we keep it, if not we move on. Each live performance is different and as we are all multi-instrumentalists we can swap instruments and include our other talents in our performances.

“Peter plays bouzouki, Massiel plays blues harp, I have my trumpet, John has multiple percussion instruments, and we all sing.”

A less-is-more approach seems to inform the choices of this Armidale-based group, which wowed audiences at the 2018 Black Gully Music Festival.

“Our rehearsals and jams are just as valuable an experience to us as the performances we do,” Anderson said.

“We only do stuff that we enjoy, so with that in mind we’ll continue performing selected shows in 2019, including the Thunderbolt Festival at Uralla in October, 2019.”

Pantor will perform at The Makers Shed, Glen Innes, during the High Country Handmade Showcase, Sunday June 2. Free entry.

Main photo: Armidale-based band Pantor performing at The Makers Shed, Glen Innes. L-R: John Kellet, Jon Anderson, Massiel Barros-Torning, guest artist Angelo Saavedra, and Peter Georkas. Photo: Peter Torning

North Star artist set to shine

“It was such a relief to finally be able to devote most of my time to painting.”

ART lovers at Inverell’s town gallery noticed a vibrant new palette in two popular 2018 group shows: the colourful, highly organic work of Kate Owen.

One of her bold abstract canvases took home an Inverell Art Prize award, and another was acquired by the gallery during its contemporary exhibition. Yet despite this flush of attention it’s been a long journey back to the canvas for this North Star artist.

And now, she’s about to open her first solo exhibition at The Makers Shed, Glen Innes, as the centrepiece of the High Country Handmade Showcase.

“I have always been ‘arty’ as have my two sisters,” Kate said.

“We all created art from a young age and I did art all the way through high school, earning the art prize in my senior year in 1988.

“I went on to do fashion design at college in Sydney and work in the industry for quite a few years before opening my own business in Moree designing and making bridal gowns and special occasion clothing.”

Not long after the turn of the millennium, Kate embarked on large-scale oil paintings, but admits to putting the brushes down when she “got busy with children”.

Her creative outlet as a young mother was through running gift, homewares and café businesses at Goondiwindi.

“I have always done something with a creative bent, however, I knew one day I would get back to my art,” she said.

“Along the way I did a few workshops here and there, mostly in acrylics in order to teach myself how to use them as the practical side of me liked the fact that they dry fast and are easy to clean up!

“A few years ago I made a promise to myself that I would get back to painting when my youngest son went away to boarding school and I no longer had children at home.”

That was at the start of 2017, and ever since Kate has devoted as much time to her art as possible in order to improve and evolve her work.

“It was such a relief to finally be able to devote most of my time to painting, if only to free my mind of all the stored up ideas and express them on the canvas,” she said. 

Life of its own

When asked about her painting technique, Kate said she leaves a lot to happenstance.

“I try hard not to concern myself with the final outcome before starting, because ultimately it is the process in getting there that creates the outcome which is never apparent to me from the start,” she said.

“Some paintings have many layers beneath which gives the final work more complexity, especially when glimpses of previous layers are left.

“I also love collage, I never throw away any bit of painted paper that could just be perfect at some stage for a particular work.”

Kate admits to being inspired by French painter Henri Matisse, a master at fluid form and bold use of highly-saturated colour. She’s also long been a fan of American illustrator Eric Carle’s The Hungry Caterpillar.

“When I want to create a body of work that has a particular theme I print pictures of photos I have taken and choose images that have particularly strong shapes,” she said.

“I look at these then put them away and then go to work on the canvas with just the memory of what I’ve seen.

“This is a technique I learned from Catherine Cassidy who I greatly admire. I was lucky enough to do a workshop with her in Sydney last August.”

COLLAGE COLOUR ‘Oasis’ (detail) by Kate Owen.

A particular inspiration for Kate is Elisabeth Cummings, the multi award-winning and highly collectible Australian artist.

“Her use of colour, line, texture and scratching back creates incredibly in-depth work,” Kate said.

“She states: ‘When I get going the painting has its own life and starts demanding certain things of itself’.”

“This resonates with me completely as often I feel that the painting controls me and not the other way around.”

Kate Owen’s solo exhibition The Happenings opens at The Makers Shed, Glen Innes, at the High Country Handmade Showcase, March 3.

Feature image by Grace Cobb.